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Loring Arthur Nesbit, 79: Patriot, loyal and hard-working

Obituaries

Loring Arthur Nesbit, 79: Patriot, loyal and hard-working

PORTLAND — Loring Arthur Nesbit, 79, of Portland, died June 25 after a courageous battle with leukemia, surrounded by his loving family.

He was born on April 26, 1935, in Avon, Massachusetts, the son of Arthur H. and Drusilla F. Nesbit. He was the older brother of Drusilla Nesbit Pedro, of Portland. Nebit grew up in the Deering Highlands area of Portland and graduated from Deering High School in 1955.

An extremely patriotic man, he took his membership in the Civil Air Patrol and Boys Cadets very seriously, and in high school was chosen to participate in Boys State in Augusta. He had a lifelong passion for historic events and World War II memorabilia, and collected related stamps, coins, classic movies, and railroad, aviation and naval items. In later years, he became an avid NASCAR fan and collector.

Nesbit was hard-working and loyal wherever he was employed. He began working at the Eastland Hotel in the 1950s, then on to the Columbia Market, Waynflete School, Deering High School, Governor’s Restaurant, and most recently Maine Medical Center, from which he retired in 2000.

He lived with and cared for his mother until she died in 1995.

Nesbit was a devoted uncle to his niece and nephews, Leanne Gravel, Phil Pedro and John Pedro; and to his grand-nieces and nephews, Danielle, Robby, Kip and Jerry Gravel, Kevin and Brian Pedro, and Morgan, Matthew and Luke Pedro. He enjoyed family events and celebrations throughout the years. He adored his sister, Dru Pedro, who cared for him for many years until his death. 

He will be remembered as a loving brother, son, uncle and friend.

The family gives thanks to Dr. Boyd and her staff, all the staff at IV Therapy in Scarborough, the caregivers at the Gibson Pavilion at Maine Medical Center and New England Rehabilitation, and the crew who looked out for him at St. Joseph’s.

There will be a private interment at Evergreen Cemetery at a later date. A celebration of his life will be held in the near future.