Fri, Nov 28, 2014 ●
BathHarpswellTopshamBrunswickCumberlandNorth YarmouthFalmouthFreeportPortlandCape ElizabethScarboroughSouth PortlandChebeague IslandYarmouth

UPDATE: 2 more candidates qualify for Cape Elizabeth ballot

News

UPDATE: 2 more candidates qualify for Cape Elizabeth ballot

CAPE ELIZABETH —Town elections are weighted with incumbents, but three new candidates hope to edge them out.

Of the eight candidates who returned enough signatures by Friday's deadline to be eligible for the Town Council and School Board seats on the Nov. 6 municipal ballot, five are incumbents.

Three incumbents and two challengers will compete for three School Board seats.

The Town Council election is uncontested, with one newcomer joining two incumbents on the ballot.

In the School Board election, Bill Gross and Michael Goulding will be challenging incumbents David Hillman, Mary K. Williams-Hewitt and board Vice Chairman John Christie. Goulding filed his nomination papers Friday.

All three incumbents were elected to their first terms on the board in 2009.

Town Councilors Jim Walsh and Jessica Sullivan hope to retain their seats this November for another three years, with James Wagner taking the third spot on the ballot after he filed papers Friday. Both incumbents were elected for the first time in 2009.

Council Chairwoman Sara Lennon, who joined the council in 2006, is not seeking re-election.

Walsh is chairman of the Ordinance Committee and is the council's representative to the Greater Portland Council of Governments. Sullivan chairs the Appointments Committee and represents the council on the Open Space and Greenbelt Management committee, the Future Open Space Preservation committee, and on the Thomas Memorial Library Foundation.

Terms for the School Board and Town Council seats are three years.

Referendums

In addition to the candidates, a $6 million bond for a new library and a proposal to amend the Town Charter to require any single capital expenditure that exceeds $1 million to automatically trigger a citizen referendum will also be on the November ballot.

Currently, citizens have to petition the Town Council to get a referendum for any large, single expenditure. Funding packages that exceed $1 million, but are made up of multiple projects that individually total less than $1 million, would not be subject to the referendum under the proposed charter amendment.

The referendum would not apply to state and federally mandated projects, or any improvements required due to fire or other catastrophe.

Will Graff can be reached at 781-3661 ext. 123 or wgraff@theforecaster.net. Follow Will on Twitter: @W_C_Graff.